BCTF SURT Workshops

School Union Representative Training Program

Introduction

Just as the president and the Executive Committee are the head of the union, and the general membership is the heart, the school union representatives are the legs of the union. No policy, action plan, or communication vehicle will be brought to life in a school without the onsite skills, knowledge, and analytical capabilities of school union representatives.

The BCTF Training Department, within the Professional and Social Issues Division, offers high-quality training programs to assist school union representatives in their ongoing work. The School Union Representative Training (SURT) Program co-ordinates the development, delivery, and evaluation of all SURT workshops for school staffs and teachers teaching on call, professional development chairs, social justice representatives, health and safety representatives, staff committee chairpersons, and local executive committee members.

(Workshops for school staffs, other teacher groupings, and district professional days can be accessed through the BCTF Professional and Social Issues Workshop program which is different and separate from the SURT program.)

The School Union Representative Training program is largely financed by a BCTF grant, which releases school union representatives for up to four days of intensive and practical training. The SURT program is intended to develop the school union representative’s hands-on, experiential knowledge, and understanding of Federation and local issues, and the skills needed to ensure local and Federation policies and procedures are actualized within schools and amongst the teachers who work there.

The title School Union Representative Training Program reflects the fact that the training program covers the different union representatives. You may wish to copy the workshop-selection pages for distribution to school union representatives and/or executive members.

Planning school union representative training

Initial considerations

Careful planning is the key to a successful and enjoyable training day.

What are the desired outcomes for the day?

Through the local strategic planning process, the desired outcomes to meet both local and Federation needs are determined. For staff representatives, training needs are often determined through a feedback survey from a previous training, or a meeting of a staff representative assembly. PD representatives generally work through the local PD chairperson to determine their training needs. Other representatives, such as social justice, health and safety, and school staff committee chairpersons, should work with their local association committees to determine their training needs. 

Who needs to receive the training?

That is a local decision, addressing a specific need in the local. Examples include:

  • a specific group (school PD or SJ representatives, executive committee, etc.) wishing a planning session
  • members new in their role as teacher representatives (rookie staff representatives, rookie PD or SJ representatives, school staff committee chairpersons, etc.)
  • those who wish training on an issue of local concern (professional ethics, health and safety, social justice, etc.).

Booking a workshop

All school union representative training must be booked through the BCTF Professional and Social Issues Division (PSID). If necessary, make the initial call to support staff, School Union Representative Training program (604-871-1860, toll-free 1-800-663-9163, local 1860 or mhope@bctf.ca) to establish the goals for the training, training topic(s), and dates. Give at least three weeks notice so that SURT facilitators, who are teachers or local officers with busy schedules, have adequate time to prepare materials and arrange travel. 

Workshop Request Online Submission Form
To book a workshop, use the “Book this workshop” link below the selected workshop description. Select “School Union Representative Training” from the program type list and click “Go.” Fill in the form and submit. Upon submission, your workshop request will be sent to the BCTF and you will receive an email confirmation of its receipt.

Locally developed training

Occasionally, a local may wish to design and develop a training workshop not offered by the BCTF. It is possible for a local to use the SURT grant for that purpose, but it is essential that such training be planned with Jenny Garrels before the workshop is given if the local is to qualify for the BCTF grant. Further, geographically adjacent locals may wish to jointly sponsor SURT workshops. Jenny Garrels can assist locals with the organization and logistics of co-sponsored SURTs.

Note: Policy 10.J.10 of the BCTF Members’ Guide requires that the local jointly plan leadership training with the Federation to qualify for the grant.

Planning with the facilitator

After booking through the PSID, you will receive:

  • a confirmation by email or fax providing the name and contact information of the facilitator.
  • A call from the facilitator to co-plan the training. 

Who can attend?

Each local is entitled to a grant for up to four days of release time for each school staff representative, including the local TTOC contact (see 10.J.10, Members’ Guide to the BCTF).

SURTs can be booked for the following union representatives:

  1. staff representatives
  2. staff committee chairpersons
  3. school PD representatives
  4. social justice representatives
  5. school health and safety representatives
  6. local executive committee members
  7. TTOCs
  8. teachers new to the profession
  9. some combination of the above.

Who pays for what?

The SURT program will pay for release time and travel for school union representatives according to the grants procedure; the SURT facilitator’s accommodation and release time expenses; and BCTF workshop materials. The local covers facility expenses, meals, and other expenses related to school union representatives’ attendance at the session.

Follow up—Taking it back to the schools

School union representatives should always be seen as members of a team of union activists who work together in each school on behalf of the members—to communicate with, advocate for, or organize and lead on union issues. Training is effective if school union representatives plan to work together as a team and take it back to the school. They put the training to practical use by sharing information/knowledge and implementing ideas with members. Discussing and planning how this is to be done is a component of every workshop. Locals can assist in the follow-up through progress reports at staff representative assemblies, newsletters to members, etc. 

Booking school union representative training days—a checklist

  • The local organizer co-plans and/or discusses training needs and ideas with Jenny Garrels, co-ordinator, School Union Representative Training Program.
  • PSID selects and contacts the facilitator (SURT facilitator).
  • The PSID staff confirms the details of the workshop, by fax, email, or phone, with the local and the facilitator.
  • The local organizer completes the Organizer’s checklist online.
  • The facilitator talks with the local organizer about the shape of the day, the location of the meeting room, A/V needs, photocopying, etc., and co-plans the delivery of the workshop.
  • The local organizer welcomes, introduces, and at the end of the day, thanks the facilitator.
  • The local sends its release-time grant application to Mary-Ellen Bullock ( mebullock@bctf.ca ), attaching a copy of the SURT Workshop confirmation form.

Online links

The role and function of the school staff representative—see Members’ Guide to the BCTF, 25.H.04
Online: bctf.ca/uploadedFiles/public/AboutUs/MembersGuide/guide.pdf.

The role and function of the PD representative—see Members’ Guide to the BCTF, 25.H.10 Online: bctf.ca/uploadedFiles/public/AboutUs/MembersGuide/guide.pdf.

BCTF contacts

  • Jenny Garrels, SURT Program co-ordinator, 604-871-1871, toll-free 1-800-663-9163, local 1871, Fax: 604-871-2286, or jgarrels@bctf.ca .
  • Support staff, School Union Representative Training, 604-871-1860, toll-free 1-800-663-9163 local 1860, Fax: 604-871-2286, or mhope@bctf.ca .
  • Mary-Ellen Bullock, SURT grant inquiries, 604-871-2222, toll-free 1-800-663-9163 local 2222, Fax: 604-871-229, or mebullock@bctf.ca .

New Teacher

New Teachers  

(5 hours)

Modules may be selected from this workshop or the complete workshop can be presented.

This workshop may also be booked in conjunction with a New Teacher Induction ceremony. This new workshop introduces new members to the local union and the BCTF. It introduces new members to the collective agreement and highlights sections most relevant to new members. It explores the responsibilities and challenges of maintaining positive professional relations with students, parents and colleagues. It builds awareness about professional issues such as professional development and professional autonomy. It promotes the work of the union and encourages new members to participate in the union. The economic, social and democratic contributions that unions have made to Canadian society are included in this workshop. 

Staff Representative

Advanced Advocacy for Staff Reps

(3–5 hours)

This workshop is a follow-up to Advocacy for Staff Reps. It focuses on the needs of the local and clauses from the collective agreement which are of concern to the local. The clauses address issues that a staff rep may have to deal with at the school level in an informal meeting with administration or a step one grievance meeting. Four scenarios are examined. One scenario reflects a clear case of a contract violation. Another demonstrates clause language which has some ambiguity about whether the union is in the right or the employer’s view is correct. A third scenario references clear language in the collective agreement but not the practice of the district or the district is attempting to change the practice. The fourth scenario isn’t about collective agreement language but the issue is huge for teachers in the school. The staff wants the staff rep to talk to administration about the problem.

All of the scenarios are dealt with through role plays. For those staff reps who would prefer not to role play, there are opportunities to act and observers and provide analysis of what they have seen and heard.

The skills, knowledge and attitudes that staff reps need in order to be successful in advocating for their colleagues are addressed in each role play. 

Advocacy for Staff Reps 

(formerly called The Complete Staff Representative from A–Z)

(3–5 hours)

It focuses on the needs of the local and clauses from the collective agreement which are of concern to the local. The clauses address issues that a staff rep may have to deal with at the school level in an informal meeting with administration or a step one grievance meeting. Four scenarios are examined. One scenario reflects a clear case of a contract violation. Another demonstrates clause language which has some ambiguity about whether the union is in the right or the employer’s view is correct. A third scenario references clear language in the collective agreement but not the practice of the district or the district is attempting to change the practice. The fourth scenario isn’t about collective agreement language but the issue is huge for teachers in the school. The staff wants the staff rep to talk to administration about the problem.
All of the scenarios are dealt with through role plays. For those staff reps who would prefer not to role play, there are opportunities to act and observers and provide analysis of what they have seen and heard.

The skills, knowledge and attitudes that staff reps need in order to be successful in advocating for their colleagues are addressed in each role play. 

Advocating for Public Education—A conversation between parents, teachers, and trustees

(3–5 hours)

This new workshop can be booked as a SURT is a PSI (Professional and Social Issues) workshop. The intent of this workshop is to bring together parents, teachers, and trustees together to invite a conversation about public education. The objective is to create a local understanding of public education in the 21st century.

The workshop asks participants to consider ways in which parents, teachers, and trustees can work together to achieve the conditions necessary for a vibrant public education system. 

Contract Awareness: Know Your RESTORED Collective Agreement

(5 hours)
This revised workshop is designed to familiarize staff reps and the school union team with the restored collective agreement language following our Supreme Court of Canada win. The facilitator will guide participants through the local's restored language, then use case studies to show how the language will be applied at the school level. The role of the staff rep is discussed, showing the importance of the enforcement of the restored language plus any applicable remedies at the school level. This is a "hands-on" workshop so participants must bring copies of their collective agreement as well as copies of the local restored language.

Education Change: The Big Picture

(5 hours)

This SURT workshop is intended for Staff Reps and Pro-D Chairs/Reps to attend together. This workshop provides reps with the “big picture” issues in education change including the importance of:

  • the school community and the values that are fundamental to public education.
  • the teacher’s professional voice, autonomy, and collective agreement rights related to education change.
  • resources, support, and working conditions necessary for the successful implementation of education change.
  • a thorough understanding of the many elements of the government’s education change plans, including revised curriculum.
  • member, local, and BCTF involvement, through appropriate processes, in any education change initiatives.

Government Intervention in the Lives of Teachers: From Then to Now

(3–5 hours)

This workshop is an overview of the last ten years of the struggle for schools, and a closer look at the issues resulting from Bill 22, The Education Improvement Act. The workshop will examine how all legislation will now affect the working and learning conditions in schools and change the rules for teacher bargaining. Participants will review new legislation/imposed conditions, provincial actions/legal challenges and plan for the local’s participation in the Strategic Plan and the Year of Action and its themes

Investigations and Discipline: Knowledge is Power

(5 hours)

The workshop focuses on investigations at the local level and moves to investigations and discipline at the Teacher Regulation Branch (TRB) level. Progressive discipline is discussed in the workshop. The school staff rep’s role in investigations is featured in this presentation.

Is it a Grievance? Problem-solving at the School Level

(5 hours)

This workshop gives union representatives an understanding of the grievance procedure for solving disputes. Participants learn their role in grievance handling and enhance their skill in helping colleagues resolve problems at the school level. Participants must bring a copy of their collective agreement in order to examine issues of local or school concern.

Keeping the Public in Education: The Dangers of Privatization

(Used to be called Hidden Privatization)

(2–3 hours)

Participants will leave this workshop with a clear understanding of what privatization is, and how privatization has permeated public schools. The workshop offers strategies to build resistance to the privatization of public schools. 

Meetings, Motions, Minutes and More 

(3 hours)

This workshop will provide participants with the skills, understanding, and knowledge to organize, conduct, and participate more effectively in large and small meetings. Whether you are chairing, moving a motion, or struggling to understand what’s happening in the meeting, this workshop is for you. Everyone has a role in making meetings effective. The workshop will cover BCTF Simplified Rules of Order, agenda setting, writing motions, principles of participation, and strategies for employing these rules successfully.

Preparation for Bargaining: The School Union Team

(3 hours)

This SURT aims to help school union reps (Staff rep, Pro-D rep, H & S rep, staff committee chairs) recognize that they have the capacity to work as a cohesive team; in other words, to work less in isolation in their capacity of supporting their colleagues. Strategies and activities are built into the SURT to help facilitate understanding, trust and communication among the school Union reps. A group approach with the school union team is more desirable at the school level. 

Role and Function of the Staff Rep

(3–5 hours)

The school staff representative is the legal representative of BCTF members at the workplace. This workshop helps them, particularly those new to the role; understand their duties and responsibilities, their legal rights, and the resources available to support them.

Staying Well at Teaching

(3–5 hours)

Teaching is complex. High public expectations, class composition, educational cutbacks, and increased accountability affect schools, teachers, and students. BCTF surveys identify increased workload and stress as significant concerns for teachers. This workshop helps teachers stay well. Setting boundaries around workload, self-care and smart choices, and de-stressing are key themes. All focus on building shared solutions to both the demands of the work and the isolation of teaching. Participants will reconnect with colleagues, laugh, and tell stories as they assess their work-life balance and explore staying well and creating a healthy workplace. Skilled teacher facilitators will design the session to suit the needs of each school staff. Retreat locations away from the school are recommended, where possible.

The School-Based Team and the Restored Collective Agreement


With the Supreme Court of Canada win, and the restoration of the stripped collective agreement language, many locals are finding that their school-based teams can now operate with language that restores a great deal of influence and decision making. However, the restored language is unfamiliar to the majority of teachers who have become accustomed to working within the stripped language. This 4 hour workshop will discuss the importance of “unlearning” past school-based team practices and the ministry designations for students with special needs.  Participants will discuss the implications of the local’s restored language and develop guidelines to ensure the language is being followed.

PD Representative

Creating a Culture of Professionalism

(3–5 hours)

This workshop explores the ways local and school teams can and do lead on professional issues, develop ideas and practices around professional cultures, and seek ways to enhance and support the autonomous professional practices of teachers.

Education Change: The Big Picture

(5 hours)

This SURT workshop is intended for Staff Reps and Pro-D Chairs/Reps to attend together. This workshop provides reps with the “big picture” issues in education change including the importance of:

  • the school community and the values that are fundamental to public education.
  • the teacher’s professional voice, autonomy, and collective agreement rights related to education change.
  • resources, support, and working conditions necessary for the successful implementation of education change.
  • a thorough understanding of the many elements of the government’s education change plans, including revised curriculum.
  • member, local, and BCTF involvement, through appropriate processes, in any education change initiatives.

Marking up the Wrong Tree? Conversations about teaching, assessment, and reporting

The revised curriculum is placing new assessment and evaluation demands on teachers. This workshop will allow participants opportunities to make sure they are doing what is actually needed and useful for assessing student learning.

Mentorship: Building an Integrated Community of Practice 

(3–5 hours)

This workshop is intended for school union representative teams, as well as groups of teachers interested in developing effective mentorship programs in their locals. Participants will explore mentorship as a way to build a collaborative culture within schools, locals, and/or districts. Questions, such as why mentoring is valuable for the teaching profession and what elements important in mentorship programs, will be addressed. The workshop will discuss the different models of mentorship programs, and how a program can be developed to work within existing local and district structures. The workshop provides participants with a range of tools to use when developing their own mentorship programs and the five-hour workshop will give local teams time to begin the planning process.

Role and Function of the PD Rep: Keep your hands off my PD

(3 hours)

This updated workshop develops the skills and knowledge of the PD chairs as a union leader using the PD lens as a strategic tool. Strategies are explored for building member and public support for professional development, advocating for teacher-centered PD, and returning control of PD to teachers.

Self-directed PD: The Autonomous Professional

(3 hours)

Participants become familiar with professional self-directed planning options that build and support teachers’ autonomy, professionalism, and collaboration. Participants will explore the differences between effective, teacher-directed PD, the "consumer model" of PD, and types of in-service, as well as some of the stumbling blocks to effective PD.

Teacher Inquiry Part 1: Teachers Collaborating in Self-directed Professional Learning

(3–5 hours)

Many teachers are ready to move to a deeper professional practice where they are in control of their professional development. Inquiry approaches have been fostered in the BCTF by the Program for Quality Teaching (PQT) and by inquiry projects supported by the Research and Technology (R & T) Department. This workshop will explore the ways in which teacher inquiry can be implemented in a local or school, the literature surrounding teacher inquiry, and how the BCTF, through its PQT and R & T projects, can help support teacher inquiry. This workshop will also assist groups in the first steps to get started with their inquiry.

Teacher Inquiry: Getting Started in Your Local

(5 hours)

Are you interested in starting a teacher inquiry project in your local or school? Are you looking for professional development that will ensure individual teacher’s needs are being met? This five-hour workshop is intended for either Local PD Reps or School Staff Reps. The workshop will review the concepts of teacher inquiry and take participants through the process of getting started on a project in their school or local. The group will explore inquiry process and begin the hands-on planning for their own inquiry.

Social Justice Representative

  • Health and Safety

    An In-depth Look at the Role of Joint Health and Safety Committees

    (5 hours)

    This workshop expands on Module 2 of the basic workshop. It looks at the duties and functions of the joint health and safety committee in the context of the four basic rights and of the general duties of employers, workers, and supervisors. Participants will discuss common difficulties committees face and will examine the effectiveness of their own committees. 

    Changes in WCB: an Overview of Changes to WCB Legislation, Policies and Regulations

    (2 hours)

    This workshops examines the changes to the Workers’ Compensation Act, WCB Policies and Occupational Health and Safety Regulations in recent past.  The workshop looks at changes as a result of Bill 35, Bill 9, Bill 14, and Bullying and Harassment Policies. The changes impact teachers and other workers around areas such as prevention, investigation, enforcement and participation in processes.

    Ergonomics

    (3 hours)

    British Columbia is one of only a few jurisdictions in the world that has comprehensive workplace ergonomics regulations. This workshop provides basic information about ergonomics and looks at the ergonomics requirements in the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. Participants will learn: how to identify ergonomic problems in their workplaces, some risk assessment techniques, and some effective control measures that can be implemented to reduce the risk to workers of musculoskeletal injuries.

    Incident Investigations and Reports

    (3 hours)

    The legal requirements of accident/incident investigations and reporting will be reviewed. Various types of incidents and causes of incidents will be discussed. Participants will discuss a case study in order to proceed through the stages of investigation—necessary facts, investigative tools, visiting the scene, interviewing, and evaluating. 

    Incident Reporting

    (1.5 hours)

    Dr. Jennifer Newman, a workplace psychologist, states that workplaces should have zero harm policies. Harm is preventable and unacceptable. All incidents must be reported and investigated to take steps to prevent further injuries or an exacerbation of injuries. The most important incidents to report are the near misses so that whatever caused the near miss is eliminated or controlled and does not cause a more serious accident or injury. This workshop will cover what should be reported, how to report, and what should come from reporting.

    Joint Health and Safety Committees/Worker Representatives

    (3 hours)

    The provisions of the Workers Compensation Act will be reviewed. Scenarios and discussion of duties and responsibilities, including committee terms of reference, will be included. Participants will go over successful strategies for effective committees, including organization of meetings and reporting responsibilities. 

    New and Young Workers

    (2 hours)

    This workshop covers Occupational Health and Safety Regulation Part 3 which defines young and new workers and the requirement to provide orientation and training prior to beginning work. Checklists, scenarios, and a review of the role of the joint health and safety committee will be included.

    Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Program

    Length: 1.5 hours

    School health and safety issues will be reviewed in the context of the workplace and necessary policies and procedures. The basic elements of an OH&S program are covered. Sample or actual school district policies and procedures will be reviewed. 

    Occupational Health & Safety Training for New Committee Members and Worker Reps

    (8 hours)

    This workshop is designed for new members of Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committees in their first six months on a committee.  Effective April 3, 2017, Worksafe BC regulations require all new members of committees and worker reps to receive 8 hours of instruction on prescribed health and safety topics (OHSR 3.27) . This workshop satisfies that requirement. The content of the workshop also serves as a good back-to-basics refresher for committee people, or as a SURT.  

    Note: The training prescribed for new committee people is outside of the 8 hour education educational leave entitled under Part3, Division 4, Section 135 of the Workers’ Compensation Act.

    Refusal of Unsafe Work

    (1 hour)

    The process of refusal of unsafe work will be covered in the school context. Scenarios and examples will be reviewed in order for participants to understand the kinds of circumstances under which refusal may occur. 

    Risk Assessment

    (3 hours)

    The primary focus of a health and safety program is the prevention of occupational injuries and disease. To be able to prevent something from happening, the hazard must first be identified and the risk of being injured or contracting a disease must be determined. Then prevention plans must be put into place to either eliminate or control the risk. This workshop will cover a thorough risk assessment of the school environment, work practices and human factors to develop prevention plans and inspection schedules based on the needs of the work place.

    Role and Function of the School Site Health and Safety Rep

    (2 hours)

    The School based health and safety rep is more than just another body around the Joint Occupational Health and Safety committee table. This workshop explores the role of the health and safety rep from the union activist perspective. The Health and safety rep is an advocate, an advisor, and an assistant. This workshop explains these roles and how they fit in the union role.

    Safety Inspections

    (3 hours)

    This module reviews the pre-inspection, inspection, and post-inspection stages. School-related checklists and other materials are used. Participants will learn how to identify hazards during safety inspections. Pictures of school activities will be used as a basis of discussion. 

    School Construction/Renovation

    (2 hours)

    This workshop deals with health and safety issues that should be considered when construction or renovation work is being done. Topics include fire safety, emergency escape routes, indoor air quality, noise, fumes, electrical equipment, and mould removal. This workshop can also be modified for presentation to the staff at schools where construction or renovation is being planned.

    Successfully Navigating the WCB Claims Process

    In this workshop, participants will learn how to give WCB claims a greater chance of success.

    Violence in the Workplace

    (3 hours)

    Workplace violence is becoming a growing concern in the education sector. Every year dozens of workers in schools are victims of threats and violence in the performance of their jobs. This workshop explores the definition of violence, types of violence, and what is required to assess and plan to reduce and eliminate risks. The workshop discusses risk assessment, safety plans, privacy issues, and the right to know, all with a focus on keeping workers safe.

    Violence Prevention

    (5 hours)

    This workshop reviews the WCB section on violence protection. Emphasis is on completing a risk assessment and on processing reports of violence, up to and including a WCB claim. In addition, the workshop discusses the law on the release of a student’s history of violence in the context of a violence protection program.

    School Leadership Team

    BCTF Code of Ethics: Understanding the Professional Relationship

    (3 hours)

    This workshop helps members understand professional behaviour as it relates to the BCTF Code of Ethics. It explores the meaning of the various clauses, the rationale and processes for enforcement of the code, and staff representatives’ role in promoting ethical conduct. Scenarios promote discussion on related work and the role of the BCTF Judicial Council.

    Capacity Building: Developing the School Leadership Team

    (3–5 hours)

    Developing the knowledge, skills, and union-mindedness of the school-based team of teacher leaders (staff representatives, PD representatives, SJ representatives, staff committee chairpersons, health and safety representatives) is an important way to build capacity in the local. This workshop looks at practical ways to use the power of the team to support and advocate for members, create positive relationships in schools, and promote teacher education agendas. (Please note: this workshop should only be booked when bringing union representatives from all the leadership areas together.)

    Creating Inclusive Spaces: Applying an Equity and Inclusion Lens to Your Local, Schools and Classrooms

    (5 hours)

    Available as a SURT or PSI workshop. This workshop will provide teachers with strategies to help contribute to more inclusive environments. Participants will be introduced to a number of barriers to inclusion based on race, gender identity, sexual orientation, class and physical ability. They will then explore strategies and resources available on the BCTF Equity and Inclusion webpages to address these barriers. Through an inquiry model, participants will begin thinking about specific actions they can take in their classrooms, schools, locals, and communities.

    Drawing on Our Analytical Toolbox: Dealing with Difficult Issues

    (3–5 hours)

    Do your staff reps and local executive need help analyzing the issues that are plaguing your local and schools? If so, this workshop will help members break down the parts of the issue so they can develop a plan of action that will help resolve issues at the school or local level. This workshop has a 3 hour version where the process is introduced. The 5 hour version gives participants hands-on experience analyzing an issue.

    Effective School Staff Committees

    (3 hours)

    Government has increased the voice of parents in schools, given greater power to administration, and limited teachers’ roles in decision-making. To maintain teacher influence and control over their professional lives, teachers require their own independent and democratic structure and processes in the worksite. This workshop offers practical advice on how to establish and maintain a school staff committee.

    Managing Conflict

    (3–5 hours)

    Conflict is inevitable in groups, but it does not need to cause division and animosity if it is managed effectively. This workshop gives participants an insight into their own conflict management styles, and gives some practice in effective conflict management and communication skills. The workshop also provides information about the mediation services available from the BCTF. This workshop is not conflict resolution, but conflict management, focusing on skills to ensure that conflicts do not escalate.

    Professional Boundary Issues: Teacher/Student Relationships

    (3–5 hours)

    Sometimes the standards of conduct between students and teachers are ambiguous. Teachers place themselves in jeopardy when boundaries are crossed. This workshop helps school staffs and TTOCs identify the boundaries and provides them with support and resources. Reference will be made to the BCTF Code of Ethics.

    School Goal Setting

    (2 hours)

    This workshop is for school staffs or other intact groups, like school departments wanting to explore and establish their vision and goals for their work. Participants will identify, share, and develop action plans in a collegial and supportive atmosphere.

    Social Media

    (5 hours)

    The social media workshop is designed to educate teachers about the professional and ethical use of social media tools like Facebook and Twitter. The workshop reviews the wide-ranging landscape of social media through the lens of appropriate boundaries and professional conduct. Participants will learn about the value of engaging online as an educator, best practices, and appropriate privacy settings. This five-hour workshop goes beyond the three-hour social media workshop as it also helps staff reps and local associations support members who are using social media or considering it.

    Social Media

    (3 hours)

    The social media workshop is designed to educate teachers about the professional and ethical use of social media tools like Facebook and Twitter. The workshop reviews the wide-ranging landscape of social media through the lens of appropriate boundaries and professional conduct. Participants will learn about the value of engaging online as an activist and educator, best practices, and appropriate privacy settings.

    The School-Based Team and the Restored Collective Agreement


    With the Supreme Court of Canada win, and the restoration of the stripped collective agreement language, many locals are finding that their school-based teams can now operate with language that restores a great deal of influence and decision making. However, the restored language is unfamiliar to the majority of teachers who have become accustomed to working within the stripped language. This 4 hour workshop will discuss the importance of “unlearning” past school-based team practices and the ministry designations for students with special needs.  Participants will discuss the implications of the local’s restored language and develop guidelines to ensure the language is being followed.

    Women in Negotiations

    (3 hours)

    A leadership priority of the Federation is to continue to build the capacity of the union, both provincially and locally to be prepared for bargaining in 2019 through the provision of training, particularly with a focus to increase the participation of female members.

    This SURT has been designed to engage more women in leadership roles in locals, but it is also intended to foster allies who will support women in taking those leadership roles, so locals will want to invite local activists such as staff representatives, staff committee chairpersons, school PD representatives, social justice representatives, school health and safety representatives, local executive committee members, TTOCs, teachers new to the profession and some combination of these people, not to exceed the local grant limits.

    This workshop will:

    • identify personal and union assets that will support the next round of bargaining
    • identify barriers to women’s participation in bargaining
    • explore and educate members about the political/organizational context and sexism and gender bias
    • raise the profile of the Collective Agreement and negotiations among women members
    • encourage and support women’s participation in their union
    • identify the support women require of their union in order to actively participate.

    Aboriginal Education

    BC Blanket Exercise: Exploring Historical Relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples 

    (2–3 hours)

    This experiential workshop will help participants understand how colonization of the land we now know as British Columbia and Canada has impacted the people who lived here long before settlers arrived. Through this exercise participants will explore the nation-to-nation relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada, how this relationship has been damaged over the years, and how we can work toward reconciliation.

    Deconstructing Myths

    (3 hours)

    In this workshop participants are submerged into the depths of the mistruths that have made up the belief systems of mainstream Canada for far too long. Participants will be challenged to dig deeper through research, which must include historical documentation and oral testimony as opposed to acceptance of archaic misinformation and hidden fabricated narratives. In a commitment to the continuation of the work that teachers started with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, BCTF invites all teachers to join in the effort to seek truth through the deconstruction of myths in curriculum.

    Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers, Part 1

    (3 hours)

    This workshop helps participants understand the employment equity concept as it relates to all teachers. The workshop will address fears, myths, and realities of employment equity. It will explore the language used in the hiring process and help members become more familiar with the topic.

    Legacy of Residential Schools

    (3 hours)

    This is a new workshop developed by the BCTF to raise awareness and understanding of the legacy of residential schools, including the effects and intergenerational impacts on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples. This workshop will:

    • provide a preview of resources available. 
    • provide demonstrations of activities used to teach at various grade levels. 
    • change attitudes and behaviours—hearts and minds. 
    • inspire the building of relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people based on mutual understanding, respect, and collective action to create a different future.

    Negotiating your Enhancement Agreement

    (3 hours)

    An Enhancement Agreement is an agreement developed between all local Aboriginal communities, the local teacher association who represents the teacher voice, a school district and the Ministry of Education designed to enhance the educational achievement of Aboriginal students and more importantly to underscore the integral nature of Aboriginal culture and ways of knowing. This workshop will provide participants with an understanding of how these agreements are developed and the importance of teacher involvement in the process.

    Project of Heart

    (3 hours)

    Project of Heart is an inquiry-based, hands-on, collaborative, intergenerational, artistic journey for seeking truth about the history of Aboriginal people in Canada. This teaching resource examines the history and legacy of Indian residential schools, commemorates the lives of the thousands of Indigenous children who died as a result, and prepares students to engage in social justice activities that contribute to the developing truth and reconciliation movement.

    En français

    Code de déontologie de la FECB

    3-5 heures

    Les représentants du personnel vont comprendre ce qu’est un comportement professionnel et sa relation au Code de déontologie de la FECB. L,atelier explore la signification des différentes clauses, leurs raisons d’être et les procédés d’application du code, et le rôle des représentants du personnel dans la promotion d’une conduite éthique. Des scénarios promeuvent la discussion sur les travaux connexes et sur le rôle du Judicial Council de la FECB.

    La gestion de conflits

    3-5 heures 

    Les conflits sont inévitables dans des groupes, mais ils n'ont pas besoin de provoquer la division et l'animosité s’ils sont gérés efficacement. Cet atelier offre aux participants un aperçu de leurs propres styles de gestion des conflits et permet un peu de pratique en matière de gestion efficace des conflits et de communication. L'atelier fournit également des informations sur les services de médiation disponibles à la FECB. Cet atelier ne porte pas sur la résolution des conflits, mais sur la gestion des conflits, en mettant l'accent sur les compétences nécessaires pour faire en sorte que les conflits ne dégénèrent pas.

     

    SURT-Comités du personnel enseignant

    (3 heures)

    Le gouvernement a donné plus de voix aux parents dans les écoles, donné plus de pouvoir à l'administration, et limité le rôle des enseignants dans le processus décisionnel. Pour maintenir l'influence de l'enseignant et son contrôle sur sa vie professionnelle, les enseignants ont besoin de leur propre structure et d’un processus décisionnel indépendant et démocratique. Cet atelier offre des conseils pratiques sur la façon d'établir et de maintenir un comité du personnel enseignant dans une école.

    Également disponible via les ateliers PSI


    SURT-Connaissances avancées de défense de droits

    (3-5 heures)

    Les représentants syndicaux du personnel enseignant vont y acquérir les compétences et connaissances nécessaires pour:

    • plaider de manière convaincante et efficace en faveur des droits des enseignants lors de réunions avec les administrateurs et les parents. 
    • participer et diriger une réunion syndicale à l'aide des Rules of Order / Règles de conduite de la FECB 
    • détecter "les fausses pistes" et apprendre à pratiquer la tolérance zéro pour les faux-fuyants 
    • pratiquer les compétences nouvellement acquises lors de jeux de rôle et de scénarios élaborés au niveau local.

    SURT-Créer une culture de professionnalisme

    (3-5 heures)

    Cet atelier explore les moyens dont les équipes locales et scolaires peuvent et doivent se conduire sur des questions professionnelles, développer des idées et des pratiques autour des cultures professionnelles, et rechercher les moyens de renforcer et de soutenir les pratiques professionnelles autonomes des enseignants.

    SURT- Devoirs et responsabilités du représentant du perfectionnement professionnel

    Cet atelier développe les compétences et les connaissances du représentant du PP. Des stratégies sont explorées pour établir le soutien du public en faveur de la construction d’un perfectionnement professionnel centré sur l'enseignant et autodirigé par lui.

    SURT- Devoirs et responsabilités du représentant en justice sociale

    (3-5 heures)

    Les représentants en justice sociale en milieu scolaire qui travaillent avec le Comité de justice sociale de la section locale peuvent explorer leurs rôles et les fonctions qu'ils ont au sein de l'école et au sein du syndicat local. Ils auront l'occasion de dresser des plans à long et à court terme et d'explorer la façon de travailler en collaboration avec d'autres dans leurs écoles et leurs communautés.

    Remarque: Les ateliers SURT peuvent être complétés par des ateliers du programme des dossiers professionnel et sociaux (PSI).

    SURT-Devoirs et responsabilités du représentant syndical

    (3-5 heures)

    Le représentant syndical du personnel enseignant est le représentant légal sur le lieu de travail des membres de la FECB. Cet atelier leur permet, en particulier ceux qui découvrent leur nouveau rôle, de comprendre leurs devoirs et responsabilités, leurs droits juridiques et de connaitre les ressources disponibles pour les soutenir.

    SURT-Est-ce un sujet de grief ? Résoudre des problèmes au niveau de l'école

    (5 heures)

    Cet atelier apporte, aux représentants syndicaux, une meilleure compréhension de la procédure de règlement des griefs afin de résoudre les différends. Les participants apprennent leur rôle dans le traitement des griefs, et apprennent à améliorer leurs compétences afin d’aider leurs collègues à résoudre des problèmes au niveau de l'école. Les participants doivent apporter une copie de leur convention collective en vue d'examiner les questions/problèmes d'intérêt local ou qui se posent au niveau de l'école.

    SURT-Ingérence du gouvernement dans la vie des enseignantes et enseignants

    (3-5 heures)

    Cet atelier est un aperçu des dix dernières années de lutte des écoles, et une analyse plus approfondie des questions découlant de la Loi 22, Education Improvement Act. L'atelier examine comment toute la législation affecte désormais les conditions de travail et d'apprentissage dans les écoles et modifie les règles de négociation des enseignants. Les participants examineront la nouvelle législation / les conditions imposées, les actions provinciales / les défis juridiques et le plan de participation des syndicats locaux aux Plan stratégique et aux thèmes de l’Année d'action.

    SURT-La privatisation dissimulée

    (2-3 heures)

    Les participants quitteront l'atelier avec une compréhension claire de ce qu’est la privatisation et de la manière dont elle imprègne les écoles publiques. L'atelier propose des stratégies pour construire la résistance à la privatisation des écoles publiques.

    SURT-Médias sociaux

    3 heures 

    L'atelier des médias sociaux est conçu pour sensibiliser les enseignants au sujet de l'usage professionnel et éthique des outils de médias sociaux comme Facebook et Twitter. L'atelier passe en revue le vaste paysage vaste des médias sociaux à travers le filtre des limites appropriées et de la déontologie. Les participants en apprendront davantage sur la valeur de l'engagement en ligne en tant qu'éducateur, les usages appropriés, les paramètres de confidentialité. Cet atelier de cinq heures aide également les représentants du personnel et les associations locales pour soutenir les membres qui utilisent déjà les médias sociaux ou qui l'envisagent.

    SURT-Recherche-action: Des enseignants collaborant dans un apprentissage professionnel autodirigé

    (3-5 heures)

    Beaucoup d'enseignants sont prêts à passer à une pratique professionnelle plus profonde quand ils ont le contrôle de leur perfectionnement professionnel. La recherche-action est favorisée par le Programme pour la qualité de l'enseignement (PQT) de la FECB et par les projets de recherche soutenus par le département de Recherche et Technologie (R & T). Cet atelier explore les façons dont la recherche-action de l'enseignant peut être mise en place dans un syndicat local ou dans une école, la littérature entourant la recherche-action de l'enseignant et comment la FECB, à travers son PQT et les projets de R & T, peut aider à soutenir la recherche-action de l'enseignant. Cet atelier aide également les groupes dans les premières étapes pour commencer.

    SURT-Une réunion bien gérée

    (3 heures)

    Cet atelier permettra aux participants d'acquérir les compétences, la compréhension et les connaissances nécessaires pour organiser, diriger et participer plus efficacement à des réunions, grandes et petites. Que vous présidiez, passiez une motion ou ayez de la difficulté à comprendre ce qui se passe lors d’une réunion, cet atelier est pour vous. Chacun a un rôle dans la mise en place de réunions efficaces. L'atelier portera sur les règles simplifiées du Rules of Order / Règles de conduite de la FECB, l'établissement de l'ordre du jour, la rédaction des motions, les principes de participation et les stratégies pour un emploi réussi de ces règles.