BCTF PD Calendar

The BCTF provides this professional development calendar as a service to members. The placement of a non-BCTF event on this calendar should not be viewed as any kind of endorsement of the event. The BCTF does not accept any liability for errors or omissions in any of the information provided. Individuals planning to attend a conference should always contact the sponsoring organization to confirm the dates and other details of registration.

The BCTF reserves the right not to publish specific non-BCTF events to the to the calendar and it is BCTF policy not publish PD events by outside agencies that are scheduled for the October provincial PSA Day.

PSA   BCTF   Non-profit Commercial

April 23, 2020 Events

« April 22, 2020  |  April 24, 2020 »


Thursday, April 23, 2020
» 25 Proven and Effective Self-Regulation Strategies and Interventions with Children and Adolescents
Apr 23 to Apr 24, Richmond, BC
Children and adolescents who struggle with self -regulation often look like those who just aren’t paying attention, have difficulty with emotional control, blurting out answers, have difficulty making transitions and/or purposely not controlling themselves. They may be unaware of the connections of their behaviour and the consequences of the behaviour. If you don’t have self-regulation, you may act out, get placed in timeout, sent to the principal’s office, then miss important learning time. A downward spiral occurs as the student gets more upset and continues to act out when given punitive consequences.

Executive functioning changes radically over the first few years, continues to improve quickly throughout adolescent years and, finally, during early adulthood years, the frontal lobes and prefrontal lobes are activated and connected to other regions of the brain. Executive function skills can be trained. It’s just like going to the gym. The more one practices these strategies for metacognition and self-regulation, the neural connections will be strengthened.

The beginnings of executive function and self-regulation skills appear in the neurotypical brain around 4 years of age. However, what happens when the prefrontal lobe and frontal cortex are compromised due to faulty brain wiring and sensory traffic jams, such as seen in autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit disorders, anxiety disorders, mood disturbances, behaviour disorders, post-traumatic disorders, poverty, attachment disorders?

This two-day seminar will address practical strategies that meet the needs of those children and adolescents who are impacted by these differences in their brain maturation. However, the participant will realize that these strategies apply to ALL students! The purpose is to provide practical tools for those clinicians, educators, therapists or parents who are directly involved in working with children and adolescents. This seminar is designed for those who are “working in the trenches.” Contact admin@jackhirose.com

25 Proven and Effective Self-Regulation Strategies and Interventions with Children and Adolescents
Apr 06 to May 25, Online Webinar
For more information and online registration please visit: http://webinars.jackhirose.com/product/morris-spring2020/

This On Demand course and will be available April 23, 2020 after purchase. Participants can watch, pause, and re-watch the sessions at their convenience until April 2021.

Children and adolescents who struggle with self -regulation often look like those who just aren’t paying attention, have difficulty with emotional control, blurting out answers, have difficulty making transitions and/or purposely not controlling themselves. They may be unaware of the connections of their behaviour and the consequences of the behaviour. If you don’t have self-regulation, you may act out, get placed in timeout, sent to the principal’s office, then miss important learning time. A downward spiral occurs as the student gets more upset and continues to act out when given punitive consequences.

Executive functioning changes radically over the first few years, continues to improve quickly throughout adolescent years and, finally, during early adulthood years, the frontal lobes and prefrontal lobes are activated and connected to other regions of the brain. Executive function skills can be trained. It’s just like going to the gym. The more one practices these strategies for metacognition and self-regulation, the neural connections will be strengthened.

The beginnings of executive function and self-regulation skills appear in the neurotypical brain around 4 years of age. However, what happens when the prefrontal lobe and frontal cortex are compromised due to faulty brain wiring and sensory traffic jams, such as seen in autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit disorders, anxiety disorders, mood disturbances, behaviour disorders, post-traumatic disorders, poverty, attachment disorders?

This two-day seminar will address practical strategies that meet the needs of those children and adolescents who are impacted by these differences in their brain maturation. However, the participant will realize that these strategies apply to ALL students! The purpose is to provide practical tools for those clinicians, educators, therapists or parents who are directly involved in working with children and adolescents. This seminar is designed for those who are “working in the trenches.”

Online Course Format
Presented by Kathy Morris, M.Ed.
2 hours per session, 6 sessions
Available on-demand April 23, 2020
Each session will consist of 2 hours of teaching content
Non-Interactive – registrants will have access to lectures, PowerPoint presentation, demonstrations, video clips, and experiential exercises.

Over 30 Proven and Effective Brief Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioural Problems
Apr 03 to May 04, Online Webinar
Available now!

http://webinars.jackhirose.com/product/olivas-spring2020/

This On Demand course and will be available immediately after purchase. Participants can watch, pause, and re-watch the sessions at their convenience. Course content available until March 2021

Over 30 Proven and Effective Brief Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioural Problems will guide you through focused, clear and proven approaches to working with children and youth. Every professional who seeks to fill their toolbox with tested methods will leave this seminar with a wealth of fresh ideas and rejuvenated spirits. With nearly 30 years of clinical experience and a background in improvisational comedy, Dr. Steve is a strong proponent of “Edu-tainment”. He uses wit and humour to enhance your learning experience, improving the retention and utilization of the skills covered. You will leave this workshop with new strategies for success and techniques to revitalize your interactions with students.

Online Course Format
Presented by Steven T. Olivas, Ph.D., HSP
2 hours per session, 3 sessions
Available on-demand
Each session will consist of 2 hours of teaching content
Non-Interactive – registrants will have access to lectures, PowerPoint presentation, demonstrations, video clips, and experiential exercises.

Restorative Justice - Facilitating Dialogue
Apr 21 to Apr 23, Vancouver, BC
A restorative justice approach works to repair harm and strengthen communities where wrong has occurred. It seeks to meet the needs of those harmed, while also considering the causes of the wrongful behavior in order to promote accountability and growth for the one who caused harm. This highly experiential workshop utilizes a trauma-informed approach, and provides frameworks for identifying and responding to the needs of all those who were impacted by the wrong. Participants will be trained in the philosophy of restorative justice and will learn the foundational skills for facilitating encounters that lead to restorative outcomes.

Hosted by the Crisis and Trauma Resource Institute. For more information or to register, please visit: https://ca.ctrinstitute.com/workshops/restorative-justice-vancouver-apr-21-2020/

The 9th International Research Conference on Adolescents and Adults with FASD: Review, Respond and Relate Integrating Research, Policy and Practice Around the World
Apr 22 to Apr 25, Vancouver, BC
Although there have been thousands of published articles in FASD in general, there has been limited research specifically on adolescents and adults with FASD or on individuals across the lifespan. As those individuals diagnosed with FASD continue to age, the need to know across a broad spectrum of areas is becoming critically important for identifying clinically relevant research questions and directions.
This interactive 2020 conference will provide an opportunity to be at the forefront of addressing these issues. We will welcome a diverse group of professionals, researchers, students, families and individuals with FASD.
The Call for Abstracts is now open, deadline: September 13, 2019: http://interprofessional.ubc.ca/initiatives/fasd2020/call-for-abstracts/
For more information, please visit the website at http://interprofessional.ubc.ca/initiatives/fasd2020/, and follow us on Twitter: @IPCE_UBC. Email marketing.ipce@ubc.ca to get on an enquiry list for updates.

The Neuropsychology of Learning Disabilities: Developing Evidenced-Based Reading, Writing, and Math Interventions
Apr 06 to May 11, Online Webinar
Please visit: http://webinars.jackhirose.com/product/feifer-spring2020/ for more information and registration

This is an On Demand course. Participants can watch, pause, and re-watch the sessions at their convenience. Course content available until May 2021.

The fundamental aim of this course is to utilize cognitive neuroscience to better understand learning disorders in children. Each lecture has been designed to examine reading, writing, and math disorders from a brain-based educational perspective. The primary learning objectives will be to classify learning disabilities into distinct subtypes based upon neural pathways in the brain. There will be a detailed discussion linking each learning disability subtype with scores of evidenced based interventions. Lastly, the role of diagnostic achievements tests that directly link assessment results with targeted interventions will be introduced with specific case studies included as well.

Reading: The Neuropsychology of Reading lectures will examine reading from a brain-based educational perspective, and classify developmental reading disorders into four distinct subtypes. An initial discussion will examine literacy rates in Canada and the United States, followed by a working definition of dyslexia. Next, there will be a discussion on multiple cognitive constructs involved with reading including phonological processing, working memory, executive functioning, and orthographical processing skills. A brief review of the Feifer Assessment of Reading (FAR) battery will be shared, as well as other key instruments used to screen and diagnose children with reading disorders and dyslexia.

Writing: The Neuropsychology of Written Language lectures will examine the cognitive underpinnings inherent within the writing process. There will be a discussion on national trends in written language, as well as gender differences in achieving proficient writing skills. In addition, three specific subtypes of writing disorders, with particular emphasis on how “frontal lobe” processes such as working memory and executive functioning impact each subtype, will be discussed as well. Lastly, five essential steps for effective written language instruction will be shared, as well as key assessment tools to evaluate written language disorders. A brief review of the Feifer Assessment of Writing (FAW) battery will be shared, along with targeted case studies.

Mathematics: The Neuropsychology of Mathematics lecture will explore how young children learn and acquire basic mathematical skills from a brain-based educational perspective. Specific pedagogical styles, the role of anxiety, and cultural differences in mathematics will be shared. There will be a discussion on three primary ways in which numbers are formatted in the brain, as well as the central role of language to expand upon conceptually ordered number sets. In addition, the role of working memory, visual-spatial reasoning, and executive functioning will be featured as core cognitive attributes to develop number sense in young children. Lastly, a brief review of the Feifer Assessment of Mathematics (FAM) battery will be discussed as well.

Online Course Format
6 Session Online Training – 2 hours per session
12 CEUs
Each session will consist of 2 hours of teaching content
Non-Interactive – registrants will have access to lectures, PowerPoint presentation, demonstrations, video clips, and experiential exercises.