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Learning Conditions

Children are eager to learn and your school community is there to help them develop and grow. When your children head off for school each day many factors contribute to their success. Good learning conditions for your children include resources, teachers, librarians, counsellors, and other specialists, and a broad-based curriculum.

Education—more than just the three Rs

Parents want to see their children flourishing in a school system that provides opportunities for all children to develop their interests and talents. While the basic subjects are very important, a well-rounded education includes the arts, physical activity, and citizenship development.

The United Nations' Declaration of the Rights of the Child, principle 7, states that "The child is entitled to receive education, which shall be free and compulsory, at least in the elementary stages. He shall be given an education which will promote his general culture and enable him, on a basis of equal opportunity, to develop his abilities, his individual judgement, and his sense of moral and social responsibility, and to become a useful member of society."

The importance of citizenship
Teachers are concerned that citizenship education is no longer the centrepiece of public education. To be effective citizens in a democracy, teachers believe that students should be knowledgeable about Canada and the world, be aware of history and trends, and understand democratic values. Citizenship education is central to preparing our young people to meet the diverse challenges of the 21st Century.

Class size

Individual attention makes the difference! Smaller classes mean better results, more opportunity, greater success.

For years, teachers and parents have known from instinct and experience that smaller classes are better for learning. In smaller classes, teachers can devote more individual attention to each student – answering questions, and helping solve small problems before they become big ones.

Effective July 1, 2002, the BC Liberal government removed learning conditions from the collective agreement. Since September 2002, the size of classes has increased and the services provided by specialist teachers such as librarians, counsellors, learning assistance teachers, ESL and others have been cut. At the same time as the number of students in each class increased, supports for students with special needs were reduced.