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Teacher Newsmagazine Volume 16, Number 2, November/December 2003

Looking back

70 years ago

We extend to the Hon. Dr. George M. Weir our sincere congratulations upon his appointment to the portfolios of Provincial Secretary and Minister of Education in the new Cabinet. It is a matter of great interest that one actively connected with education throughout his life should be called upon to take charge of the educational administration of the Province. His practical experience with the many phases of education will be of inestimable advantage to him in dealing with the many problems of administration of his department. We may look forward with confidence to a sane and progressive development of our educational system.

The B.C. Teacher, November 1933

50 years ago

Many teachers feel a moral responsibility to respect picket lines established by striking employees, and others believe they should at least go so far as to refuse to work where hired strike-breakers may be employed. On the other hand, many teachers regard their professional responsibility to pupils and parents, and their contractual obligation to the school board, as the paramount consideration. Feeling itself incapable of recommending a policy that adequately reconciles these points of view, the Executive established a new Labour Relations Committee, and instructed it to bring in a full report to the December Executive meeting.

The B.C. Teacher, November 1953

30 years ago

The time has arrived for teachers, students and parents to participate in the selection of school principals. This does not mean giving control of the selection process to any one of these three groups, but it does mean that all three should play a meaningful role. The decade of the 1970s has brought a growing acceptance of the idea that those who are affected by decisions must be involved in the making of those decisions. In the area of education, this means that the three groups most immediately affected by administrative decision-making, i.e., teachers, students, and parents, must participate in the formation of those decisions.

The B.C. Teacher, November 1973

10 years ago

Teachers from North Vancouver and Nanaimo have proven that class size and mainstreaming provisions in contract make a big difference to the quality of education. Both locals successfully grieved violations of their collective agreements, resulting in two significant arbitration awards. The locals’ perseverance paid off not only in better working and learning conditions but also in establishing good case law for the other locals in the province.

Teacher Newsmagazine, November 1993

Chris Bocking, Keating Elementary School, Saanich



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