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Who’s lobbying government?

The B.C. government website, Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists, contains information on obbying. Click on Who’s Lobbying Who in BC to view the information on the activity of registered lobbyists.

The determination of who must register as a lobbyist is contained in the Lobbying Registration Act. The web site specifies the following information:

“Lobbying occurs when a paid lobbyist communicates with a public office holder in an attempt to influence:

  • the development of any legislative proposal
  • the introduction, passage, defeat or amendment of any bill or resolution
  • the making or amendment of any regulation
  • the development or amendment of any government policy or program
  • the awarding of any contract, grant, contribution or other financial benefit by or on behalf of the government of British Columbia
  • for consultant lobbyists only, the arranging of a meeting between a public office holder and any other person

“The LRA defines three categories of lobbyists: 

  • consultant lobbyists paid to lobby on behalf of a client, for example, government relations consultants, lawyers, accountants or other professionals who provide lobbying services for their clients
  • in-house lobbyists employed by persons or businesses that carry on commercial activities for financial gain
  • in-house lobbyists employed by non-commercial organizations such as advocacy groups and industry, professional and charitable organizations”

In order to be required to register as a lobbyist, the in-house lobbyist must spend a significant part of their duties on lobbying, defined as:

“The term significant part of duties is defined as 20 per cent of the employee’s time. For example, if you assume a five-day work week, an in-house lobbyist would have to lobby on average a minimum of four days per month to reach the 20 per cent threshold. This applies to time actually spent lobbying, not creating research papers, etc.”